Making the Best of College

As we have mentioned many times before, transitioning from high school to college is a big change for students. This can be intimidating, but it can also open up the door to self-improvement by being involved in campus activities and establishing new relationships with peers. Here are a few videos from students to students that can help incoming students make the best out of their college life.

Being involved:

Establishing new relationships:

Not only do these opportunities make college more fun and less stressful, they also help students grown and prepare them for a successful life after college!

Join us at World Future Forum for more research findings and best practices on Post-High School Challenges!

Transferable Skills

According to the IFTF (Institute for the Future), the workplace is changing drastically due to the developing technology, economy, environment, and politics. This can sound intimidating. How can your students prepare for a new work environment?  No need to fear, here are ten transferable skills that will help your students (and you) have an advantage no matter  their career field!

Click on the blue text below to learn more about each transferable skill:

Join us at World Future Forum for more research findings and best practices on Workforce Skills & Demands!

Advising for College Persistence and Retention

In our previous blog,  we mentioned that academic advising helps a student feel a sense of direction and motivates them to continue their college education. Here is an example of a community college located in a Chicago suburb that embraced this resource and the impact it had on the institution.

President Joianne Smith of Oakton Community College started the All for One program in efforts to halt the high dropout rate. At the time, five students were leaving Oakton Community College per day. This program encouraged all faculty and staff members to meet with at least one student five times a semester; however, the Oakton faculty and staff went above and beyond their initial goal. They went on to schedule 15-minute one-on-one conferences with each students in at least one of their classes. They focused on listening to students and getting to know them at a more personal level. Additionally, they learned their students’ names and encouraged other students to learn each other’s names.

In one year, the All for One program reduced the student drop out rate by 20 percent! Read more on the All for One program here.

Join us at World Future Forum for research findings and best practices in college transition and persistence!