Feeling Unprepared for College and Career

“One important key to success is self-confidence. An important key to self-confidence is preparation.”
-Arthur Ashe, American tennis player

In a blog post from earlier this month, Background Information, we provided study results which clearly stated that most students do not feel prepared for college and career. This means teachers have two big jobs in high schools:

  1. Prepare their students for the future
  2. Making sure their students feel prepared to take on the future

What happens when individuals do not feel prepared to take on life after high school? Most people get frustrated and/or discouraged; therefore, they:

  • decide not to pursue a higher education: In 2016, the United States’ Bureau of Labor Statistics noted that 72.3% of high school graduates did not enroll in college.
  • either go to college but never graduate: According to Forbes, only 28% of students completed a bachelor’s degree in the expected amount of time at various schools in 2016. This means that nearly 2 million students dropout each year before graduating.
  • or find a job that is not related to their college degree: The Federal Reserve Bank of New York found that in 2010 only 62.1% of college graduates had a job that required a college degree and only 27.3% of college graduates had a job remotely related to their major.

This is very unfortunate because according to SmartAsset, the average yearly salary for a worker with a high school diploma is $35,256 and $38,376 for a worker with some college but not degree. While the yearly salary for a worker with a bachelors degree is $59,124. That is almost a $24,000 difference that makes a big difference in a person’s lifestyle.

Join us at World Future Forum for more research findings and best practices on College and Career Outcomes of High Schools!

Next Generation High Schools

“…I’m announcing a new challenge to redesign America’s high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy… We’ll reward schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering and math.”
— President Barack Obama, 2013 State of the Union Address

During the month of November, we will be discussing Next Generation High Schools. This is a hot topic of discussion in the United States’ education system, especially since President Obama’s State of the Union Address in 2013. Next Generation High Schools are high school institutions that have altered their curriculum in order to better prepare students for success in the twenty-first century by focusing on individual students. Additionally, they emphasize the importance of a partnership between high schools, post-secondary institutions and businesses or organizations which are potential work places for students.

The U.S Department of Education established the following principles of Next Generation High Schools:

  • Redesigning academic content to promote active and hands-on learning aligned with post-secondary and career-readiness
  • Personalizing academic content and strengthen the connection to the educational needs and interests of individual students
  • Ensuring strong content knowledge and skills for teachers in all subjects including STEM
  • Providing and personalizing academic and wrap-around support services for those students who need them
  • Providing high-quality career and college exploration and counseling on options for students after high school graduation
  • Offering multiple opportunities to engage in post-secondary learning, which includes earning college credit while still in high school
  • Redesigning the scope and sequence of learning time in more innovative and meaningful ways, incorporating innovations such as educational technologies, project-based learning, and competency-based progressions

During the next few weeks we will be providing high school educators with various information on Next Generation High Schools. Make sure you keep up with our blog and follow us on social media!

Join us at World Future Forum for more research findings and best practices on Next Generation High Schools!

College Transition and Persistence

Did you know that 28% of students drop out before they even become a sophomore?

At Future Institute, we provide two programs that directly impact college transition and persistence for all Concept Schools alumni.

  • College Liaisons are Concept Schools alumni who are now in college. These liaisons reach out to Concept Schools graduates who enrolled in their university in order to provide a smooth transition into the collegiate environment.
  • FIRM, or Future Institute Road-to-Success Mentorship, provides alumni with mentors who are professionals in their chosen career fields to guide and motivate them to achieve their goals.

A university that also provides programs to ease the transition and promote college persistence, especially for new students, is the University of Illinois – Chicago. The Office of the First-Year Initiatives focuses on this topic exactly and builds a welcoming environment for students. This is only one of many programs offered by this university to ensure student success.

Join us at World Future Forum for research findings and best practices in college transition and persistence!