High School Plans for College Readiness

This month, we have presented how schools can help students prepare for college. We also provided a few tips on how students can prepare academically, socially, and financially. But what exact measures can students take especially during high school?

We understand that all of the information can feel a bit overwhelming. Do not worry! Here is a simple four-year checklist that you can share with all high schools students from freshmen to seniors:

In addition, we recommend introducing your students to KnowHow2Go for advice, college success stories, campus tours, and a college quiz!

Join us at World Future Forum for more research findings and best practices on Academic Preparation for College Readiness!

Academic, Social, and Financial Preparation

Academically preparing for college can put your students ahead of the game; however, it is important that they also understand how to prepare socially and financially as well. If a student is prepared academically, socially and financially, their college career will be much more manageable as all these factors work hand-in-hand. Here are a few tips for students. Click on the links (blue text) for helpful resources.

Students can academically prepare by learning how to take notes, improving their time management skills, getting organized and preparing to read very often. Many professors will provide an abundance of information in class or in readings so it can be overwhelming for unprepared students.

College is a very different social environment and this can be very stressful for some students, especially first-generation college students. The best way for students to prepare is by learning to work well with others, improving their communications (soft) skills and participating in class, and extracurricular activities. College will call for many group assignments, which can be a nightmare if students cannot adapt to this.

Preparing financially is very important, because if a student is not prepared it can cause a lot of stress. Read our Avoiding Student Debt blog post for tips on financially preparing before college.

Join us at World Future Forum for more research findings and best practices on Academic Preparation for College Readiness!

College Readiness Initiatives

In this blog, we have discussed ways in which teachers can “nudge” students to further their education after high school; but how are we academically preparing students to take on college? Here are some examples on how to aim for college readiness.

Some high schools have concentrated their efforts in providing help for college entrance exams. With assistance from the University of Richmond, a Richmond, Virginia high school teacher founded The College Readiness Initiative. This initiative provides free online tests and study materials for the SAT test, as well as the SOL (Standards of Learning) or Virginia state test. Check out The College Readiness Initiative at www.collegereadyrva.org.

The Colorado Department of Education has worked towards college readiness by implementing the ICAP, Individual Career and Academic Plan. This program guides students into learning more about themselves and deciding on their post-high school plan. This is a great method for students to know or have a general idea of what major they would like to pursue. To learn more and view the ICAP Toolkit, visit www.cde.state.co.us/postsecondary/icap

Other options include providing college courses during high school, assigning group work/projects, teaching time management skills, and assigning research papers. What is your high school doing to academically prepare students for college? Share with us on the Twitter poll found here

Join us at World Future Forum for more research findings and best practices on Academic Preparation for College Readiness!

Academic Preparation for College Readiness

As we prepare to end the year 2018, we will focus on different ways that students, especially high school students, and schools can prepare for college readiness. Some of the topics we will discuss are college readiness initiatives for schools and academic, social and financial preparation for students.

It is no doubt that college pays off. College enrollment rates have increased a significant 28 percent between 2000 and 2016 and they are projected to continue increasing as stated by The National Center for Education Statistics. The Pew Research Center provides the following graph comparing earnings  of young adults with no college, some college and a college degree. To read more, visit http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2014/02/11/the-rising-cost-of-not-going-to-college

The U.S. Department of Education’s Federal Student Aid website has provided checklists for Elementary School, Middle School, High School, and adult students interested in preparing for college. Find these useful checklists here.

Join us at World Future Forum for more research findings and best practices on Academic Preparation for College Readiness!